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LONG    L^NCE

all of our fastest-travelling scouts and young men,
quietly slipped out of our camp and disappeared,
According to prearranged directions, they fanned
out to the right and left in a northerly route
and crept noiselessly toward the place where the
herd had disappeared that afternoon. All during
the early night we heard wolves calling to one
another; Arctic owls, night-hawks and panthers
crying out moanfully in the mystic darkness of
the rugged plateau. They were the signals of
our men, informing one another of their move-
ments.

Then, about midnight, everything became
deathly quiet. We knew that they had located
the herd and surrounded it, and that they were
now lying on their bellies, awaiting the first
streaks of dawn and the signal to start the drive.

One of our sub-chiefs. Chief Mountain Elk, now
went through our camp, quietly giving instruc-
tions for all hands to line themselves along the
great runway to 'beat in* the herd. Every
woman, old person, and child in the camp was
called up to take part in this particular phase of
the drive. We children and the women crept
over to the runway and sprawled ourselves along
the outside of the fence3 while the men went
beyond the fenced part of the runway and con-
cealed themselves behind the brush and logs—
where it was a little more dangerous,
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